Planet JDKNews and views from the Java SE Development-Kit CommunityVariousStephen Colebourne: From Java 8 to Java 11Stephen Colebournetag:blogger.com,1999:blog-741750605858169835.post-19864038888299854852018-09-06T10:01:00Z2018-09-06T10:01:00Z <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p> Moving from Java 8 to Java 11 is trickier than most upgrades. Here are a few of my notes on the process. </p></div> Stephen Colebourne2018-09-06T10:01:00ZStephen Colebourne: Time to look beyond Oracle's JDKStephen Colebournetag:blogger.com,1999:blog-741750605858169835.post-28175846067362211402018-09-03T08:38:00Z2018-09-03T08:38:00Z <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p> From Java 11 its time to think beyond Oracle's JDK. Time to appreciate the depth of the ecosystem built on OpenJDK. Here are some of the key builds available. </p></div> Stephen Colebourne2018-09-03T08:38:00ZMarcus Hirt: JMC 7 Early Access Builds Available (and New Packaging)Marcus Hirthttp://hirt.se/blog/?p=10072018-08-28T11:47:52Z2018-08-28T11:47:52Z <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Early access builds of JDK Mission Control are now available. They can be fetched from here: http://jdk.java.net/jmc/ With JMC 7, we are switching to a new delivery model, with a separate installer for JMC. There are multiple reasons for this, such as having one deliverable which supports both OpenJDK and the Oracle JDK, and wasting […]</div> Marcus2018-08-28T11:47:52ZStephen Colebourne: Java is still available at zero-costStephen Colebournetag:blogger.com,1999:blog-741750605858169835.post-38436283151007111362018-08-28T06:53:00Z2018-08-28T06:53:00Z <div xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><p> The Java ecosystem has always been built on a high quality $free (zero-cost) JDK available from Oracle, and previously Sun. This is as true today as it always has been - but the new six-monthly release cycle does mean some big changes are happening. </p></div> Stephen Colebourne2018-08-28T06:53:00Z